Library Blog

Kendriya Vidyalaya Port Trust, Kochi

Calibre: A Versatile e-Book Library Management Tool


The KV Port Trust library uses Calibre, a free and open-source e-book computer software application suite, to manage its e-book collection (presently comprising 650 documents which include past question papers, textbooks, fiction and non-fiction books, encyclopedias, periodical back issues, etc.).

Calibre runs on multiple platforms, allows users to manage e-book collections as well as to create, edit, and read e-books. It supports a variety of formats (including the common Amazon Kindle and EPUB formats), e-book syncing with a variety of e-book readers, and conversion (within DRM restrictions) from different e-book and non-e-book formats.

Calibre supports many file formats and reading devices. Most e-book formats can be edited, for example, by changing the font, font size, margins, and metadata, and by adding an auto-generated table of contents. Conversion and editing are easily applied to appropriately licensed digital books, but commercially purchased e-books may need to have digital rights management (DRM) restrictions removed. Calibre does not natively support DRM removal but may permit DRM removal after the installation of plug-ins with that functionality.

Calibre allows users to sort and group e-books by metadata fields. Metadata can be pulled from many different sources (e.g., ISBNdb.com; online booksellers; and providers of free e-books and periodicals in the US and elsewhere, such as the Internet Archive, Munsey’s, and Project Gutenberg; and social networking sites for readers, such as Goodreads and LibraryThing). It is possible to search the Calibre library by various fields (such as (author, title, or keyword, though as of May 2011 full-text search had not yet been implemented.

E-books can be imported into the Calibre library, either by sideloading files manually or by wirelessly syncing an e-book reading device with the cloud storage service in which the Calibre library is backed up or with the computer on which Calibre resides. Additionally, online content-sources can be harvested and converted to e-books. This conversion is facilitated by so-called “recipes”, short programs written in a Python-based domain-specific language. E-books can then be exported to all supported reading devices via USB, Calibre’s integrated mail server, or wirelessly. Mailing e-books enables, for example, sending personal documents to the Amazon Kindle family of e-book readers and tablets.

The content of the Calibre library can be remotely accessed. This can be accomplished via a web browser, if the host computer is running and the device and host computer share the same network; in this case, pushing harvested content from content sources is supported on a regular interval (“subscription”). Additionally, if the Calibre library on the host computer is stored in a cloud service, such as Box.net, Google Drive, or Dropbox, then either the cloud service or a third-party app, such as Calibre Cloud or CalibreBox, can be used to remotely access the library.

Since version 1.15, released in December 2013, Calibre also contains an application for creating and editing e-books directly, similar to the more full-featured Sigil application, but without that application’s WYSIWYG editing mode.

At every launch, Calibre connects to Calibre-ebook.com, in order to check for updates. Several third-party developers offer apps to help calibre users manage and sync the e-books on their mobile devices with those loaded in calibre.

[Calibre info courtesy: Wikipedia]

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Choosing Website Colour

The colour scheme of a website is of utmost importance for making it attractive and making a good first impression. Since a lot of surfing is done in a hurry, the first instant decides whether a surfer wants to stay or move away from a website. The colour scheme you choose can prove to be decisive here. Besides each colour seem to have hidden qualities to it.

With HTML color codes you can set the color of web site background, color of text, cells in tables and much more.
Using HTML color codes for web site background color:

<body style="background:#ffffff">

The above code will set your webpage background colour to white.

A lot of colour codes are listed in this url: http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_colornames.asp

So you are wondering “Does this weird combination of letters and numbers have any meaning?” Well the answer is “Yes” and this is how it goes:)

HTML Codes format:

Each HTML code contains symbol “#” and 6 letters or numbers. These numbers are in hexadecimal numeral system. For example “FF” in hexadecimal represents number 255 in Decimal.

Meaning of symbols:
The first two symbols in HTML color code represents the intensity of red color. 00 is the least and FF is the most intense. The third and fourth represents intensity of green and fifth and sixth represents the intensity of blue. So with combining the intensity of red, green and blue we can mix almost any color that our heart desire.

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Book Highlight



Told in diary form by an irresistible heroine, this playful and perceptive novel from the New York Times bestselling author of the May Bird trilogy sparkles with science, myth, magic, and the strange beauty of the everyday marvels we sometimes forget to notice.

Spirited, restless Gracie Lockwood has lived in Cliffden, Maine, her whole life. She’s a typical girl in an atypical world: one where sasquatches helped to win the Civil War, where dragons glide over Route 1 on their way south for the winter (sometimes burning down a T.J. Maxx or an Applebee’s along the way), where giants hide in caves near LA and mermaids hunt along the beaches, and where Dark Clouds come for people when they die.

To Gracie it’s all pretty ho-hum…until a Cloud comes looking for her little brother Sam, turning her small-town life upside down. Determined to protect Sam against all odds, her parents pack the family into a used Winnebago and set out on an epic search for a safe place that most people say doesn’t exist: The Extraordinary World. It’s rumored to lie at the ends of the earth, and no one has ever made it there and lived to tell the tale. To reach it, the Lockwoods will have to learn to believe in each other—and to trust that the world holds more possibilities than they’ve ever imagined.

Book info & cover courtesy: goodreads.com