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Kendriya Vidyalaya Port Trust, Kochi

Create Original Artwork Online


List of 45 websites where students can create their original artwork.
mrssmoke.onsugar.com
Create original artwork online

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IPL2 (Internet Public Library): Indexing the invisible web

What is the invisible web?
The “visible web” is what you can find using general web search engines. It’s also what you see in almost all subject directories. The “invisible web” is what you cannot find using these types of tools. It is also known as the “deep web”.

These types of pages used to be invisible but can now be found in most search engine results:

– Pages in non-HTML formats (pdf, Word, Excel, PowerPoint), now converted into HTML.
– Script-based pages, whose URLs contain a ? or other script coding.
– Pages generated dynamically by other types of database software (e.g., Active Server Pages, Cold Fusion). These can be indexed if there is a stable URL somewhere that search engine crawlers can find.

There are still some hurdles search engine crawlers cannot leap. When you search in a library catalog, article database, statistical database, etc., the results are generated “on the fly” in answer to your search. Because the crawler programs cannot type or think, they cannot enter passwords on a login screen or keywords in a search box. Thus, these databases must be searched separately. Google Scholar is part of the public or visible web. It contains citations to journal articles and other publications, with links to publishers or other sources where one can try to access the full text of the items. This is convenient, but results in Google Scholar are only a small fraction of all the scholarly publications that exist online. Much more – including most of the full text – is available through article databases that are part of the invisible web. The UC Berkeley Library subscribes to over 200 of these, accessible to our students, faculty, staff, and on-campus visitors through our Find Articles page. Search engine companies exclude some types of pages by policy, to avoid cluttering their databases with unwanted content. Think of the billions of possible web pages generated by searches for books in library catalogs, public-record databases, etc. Each of these is created in response to a specific need. Search engines do not want all these pages in their web databases, since they generally are not of broad interest. A web page creator who does not want his/her page showing up in search engines can insert special “meta tags” that will not display on the screen, but will cause most search engines’ crawlers to avoid the page.

IPL2 is a tool which can aid you in searching the “invisible web”.

IPL2 (IPL stands for Internet Public Library) was formed in January 2010 by merging the collections of IPL and LII (Librarian’s Internet Index) websites. The site is hosted by Drexel University’s College of Information Science & Technology, and a consortium of colleges and universities with programs in information science are involved in developing and maintaining the IPL2.

IPL2 is a public service organization and a learning/teaching environment. To date, thousands of students and volunteer library and information science professionals have been involved in answering reference questions for our Ask an IPL2 Librarian service and in designing, building, creating and maintaining the IPL2’s collections. It is through the efforts of these students and volunteers that the IPL2 continues to thrive to this day.

IPL2 has the following sections:

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Online Hindi Typing (Transliteration) Tools

Typing in hindi will not be a problem if you know hindi typing and have the necessary software installed. But if you are not trained in hindi typing and are not familiar with a hindi keyboard, you can still type in hindi using some online tools. And you don’t have to use a hindi keyboard for this, because it is simple transliteration. That is, you type in English (use the English letters to spell hindi words), and the online tool does the rest.
Using these tools you can type in almost all the Indian regional languages, too.

Webdunia utilites: Hindi typing
Google transliteration
GIST-TRANS by C-DAC
Transliteration (Tech Informatics)
Hindi transliteration
Quillpad

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Choosing Website Colour

The colour scheme of a website is of utmost importance for making it attractive and making a good first impression. Since a lot of surfing is done in a hurry, the first instant decides whether a surfer wants to stay or move away from a website. The colour scheme you choose can prove to be decisive here. Besides each colour seem to have hidden qualities to it.

With HTML color codes you can set the color of web site background, color of text, cells in tables and much more.
Using HTML color codes for web site background color:

<body style="background:#ffffff">

The above code will set your webpage background colour to white.

A lot of colour codes are listed in this url: http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_colornames.asp

So you are wondering “Does this weird combination of letters and numbers have any meaning?” Well the answer is “Yes” and this is how it goes:)

HTML Codes format:

Each HTML code contains symbol “#” and 6 letters or numbers. These numbers are in hexadecimal numeral system. For example “FF” in hexadecimal represents number 255 in Decimal.

Meaning of symbols:
The first two symbols in HTML color code represents the intensity of red color. 00 is the least and FF is the most intense. The third and fourth represents intensity of green and fifth and sixth represents the intensity of blue. So with combining the intensity of red, green and blue we can mix almost any color that our heart desire.

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Introducing Kids To Libraries

In an effort to develop an early love of reading and encourage usage, libraries these days are increasingly child friendly. But when is the best time to introduce your child to this exciting new world?


Each Kid is Different

The first thing to remember is that each child is different. That may sound obvious, but it’s easy to overlook how different in temperament children of the same age can be, even when they’ve grown up in the same environment. Ask any parent! For this reason, it’s impossible to offer guidelines on the basis of age. One should consider the child’s temperament. One child may enjoy the peaceful environment of the library and be content to spend long periods looking through the books on offer, whilst another of the same age may be bored and thus disruptive to other library users.


Stand in their Shoes

Try and think like a small child when considering your first trip to the library. Put yourselves in their little shoes, if you will. Remember that a child has a very short attention span compared to an adult, and will require stimulation to retain concentration for more than a very short period. It is perfectly normal for some young children to be bored by hand-off type entertainment, so bearing this in mind it may be sensible to limit your first visits to the library to short trips whilst just choosing a book.


Entice Kids into the Library

Although a child will find the different environment of the library interesting, it’s best to keep the first visit short in order to maintain their interest. The new people, interesting things to look at and different activities to explore will all appeal to a young child, and you can make each visit a little longer to enable them to explore this new environment at their own pace. The aim is to make the library a relaxed, interesting and friendly place to visit and to develop a lifelong passion for visiting. By not overwhelming your child on their first visit, you should be able to ensure that your child will look forward to their subsequent trips.

One idea for a first outing to the library would be order a book in advance, either by phone or online, and then take your child into the library with you when you visit the front desk to collect it. It will provide a brief introduction without allowing the child to become bored.


Libraries Like Kids, Too!

Do investigate what activities your local library offers for young children. Many recognise that the library can become a part of a child’s life long before they can read and offer activities from a child’s first year. These may include readings from popular children’s books, or perhaps puppet shows or re-enactments of favourite stories. For older children there may additionally be reading challenges, competitions or other interesting events scheduled.

Finally, don’t underestimate the importance of visiting the library in teaching your child valuable social skills which will be invaluable for the future. Learning to replace books and take care of them teaches respect for things which do not belong to them, whilst behaving quietly and showing consideration for other library users teaches personal responsibility.

Introducing your child to the wonderful world of libraries whilst they are young will ensure that they grow up appreciating and making the most of this most marvelous resource.

[From http://ezinearticles.com/?Introducing-Kids-to-Libraries—A-World-of-Reading-Awaits&id=2457833%5D

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Shampoo was invented in India, not the commercial liquid ones but the method by use of herbs. The word 'shampoo' itself has been derived from the Sanskrit word champu, which means to massage.

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Book Highlight



Told in diary form by an irresistible heroine, this playful and perceptive novel from the New York Times bestselling author of the May Bird trilogy sparkles with science, myth, magic, and the strange beauty of the everyday marvels we sometimes forget to notice.

Spirited, restless Gracie Lockwood has lived in Cliffden, Maine, her whole life. She’s a typical girl in an atypical world: one where sasquatches helped to win the Civil War, where dragons glide over Route 1 on their way south for the winter (sometimes burning down a T.J. Maxx or an Applebee’s along the way), where giants hide in caves near LA and mermaids hunt along the beaches, and where Dark Clouds come for people when they die.

To Gracie it’s all pretty ho-hum…until a Cloud comes looking for her little brother Sam, turning her small-town life upside down. Determined to protect Sam against all odds, her parents pack the family into a used Winnebago and set out on an epic search for a safe place that most people say doesn’t exist: The Extraordinary World. It’s rumored to lie at the ends of the earth, and no one has ever made it there and lived to tell the tale. To reach it, the Lockwoods will have to learn to believe in each other—and to trust that the world holds more possibilities than they’ve ever imagined.

Book info & cover courtesy: goodreads.com