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Kendriya Vidyalaya Port Trust, Kochi

Create Original Artwork Online


List of 45 websites where students can create their original artwork.
mrssmoke.onsugar.com
Create original artwork online

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Why kids like horror stories

Whether it’s shuddering through the latest horror film or delighting in the gory side of Halloween, many children seem to love being scared. What is it about being scared that lights up so many kids, tweens and teens?

Being Scared is an Easy Way to Take Risks
Children, particularly those in the late tween and teen years, tend to want to take risks. This occurs due to their cognitive development, which makes them feel invulnerable. They have few opportunities to take actual risks, however, like jumping from high places or traveling at high speeds. In other words, adult supervision, days filled by structured activities and their own self-control thwart their developmental desires. Therefore, it’s easiest to “take risks” by braving a haunted hayride, watching a scary Halloween movie, or going on a mind-bending roller coaster. They get the same sense of living on the edge, but in a forum that’s accessible and acceptable.

Being Scared Creates a Sense of Adventure
Tweens and teens also crave some unpredictability and adventure in their lives. A good portion of their days center around routines, including school, homework, mealtime and bedtime. While routines are important for healthy functioning, too much of the same thing can lead to boredom and even mood issues. Developmentally, tweens and teens are peaking in terms of physical abilities, energy and need for novelty. It makes sense, then, that they love being scared, because it “shakes things up” in their lives.

Being Scared Provides a Feeling of Success
Young tweens are developing a crucial part of their personality called industry. This means they want to feel like they can take on tasks and be successful at them. By putting themselves in scary situations, they get to actively test themselves. When they’ve made it through a whole horror flick, for example, their sense of industry is bolstered, as is their sense of self-esteem.

Being Scared Helps Children Understand Death
Children do not have an adult understanding of death until about thirteen years of age. As they struggle to understand the abstract concept of death, children often become fascinated by the topic. Since death is rather removed from everyday American lives, however, it is a difficult topic to explore. In addition, children find that if they discuss death or draw pictures involving death, teachers and parents tend to respond negatively. Therefore, a safe and culturally-acceptable way of exploring death is through horror movies and Halloween activities.

All in all, although being scared may overwhelm them at times, children find the feeling irresistible because it serves their ever-changing developmental needs.

[From http://tweenparenting.about.com%5D

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Make sums equal: Mathematics puzzle 2

[The following Maths puzzle is sent by Mr.S.Muraleedharan, who has worked as a Maths Teacher in Kendriya Vidyalaya Port Trust for several years. The author conducts motivational sessions both for students and teachers. He handles the column “Work it Out” for school children in Deccan Chronicle. The answer to the puzzle can be seen by clicking on the link “Click here for answers” at the end of the page.]

Puzzle 2: Eight numbered bricks are arranged vertically in two columns as shown below. Can you make the sum of the numbers in each column equal by just changing the position of one brick?

Click here for the answer
[NOTE: The answer page is password protected. The Password is puzzlex.]

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Puzzles for the mental development of kids

A century ago Sam Lloyd, America’s greatest puzzler, said “I have always treated and considered puzzles from an educational standpoint, for the reason that they constitute a species of mental gymnastics which sharpen the wits and train the mind to reason along straight lines.”

A child’s IQ and scholastic performance always depend on the quality of intellectual stimulation and social environment. As a teacher I feel that puzzles are an often neglected, but commonly available, resource.

Puzzles are often an individual activity, requiring a high degree of concentration for an extended period of time. Such fascinating mysteries can captivate a child’s mind — and in the end the success is theirs alone! It is a wonderful way for children to gain confidence in their own growing abilities.

Puzzles develop social and literary skills
Puzzles can also be an enjoyable family or group activity. These games can promote collaboration for strategies, observation, teamwork and a sense of collective achievement.
Picture puzzles give excellent opportunities for conversation between child and parent, and between children. It also promotes “self-talk” which helps children develop their own language skills. Puzzles are an excellent way to introduce new words and concepts in a comfortable setting.

Parents can groom their kids while doing puzzles with them. Children can develop social and moral skills while having fun.

How to select a good puzzle?
Kids often enjoy doing puzzles that seem “easy” to elders — but the puzzle is just right for them. They may even do the same puzzles over and over again. The important thing with puzzles is experiencing success and mastery of logic in a entertaining, non-frustrating way.

All puzzles develop patterning and problem solving skills and will increase your child’s self-confidence.

As a teacher for many years, I know from experience that there is an educational value in all types of puzzles. The skills acquired and practiced in completing picture puzzles are a fundamental part of successful learning. Doing puzzles develops several functions of the brain simultaneously as a child is engaged but also learns. Most notably developed in this learning process are the abilities to reason, deduce, analyze, sequence, and develop logical thought and problem solving skills.

Children will move to harder puzzles when they are ready. Some children move quickly through puzzles while others will take their time. Children should be encouraged to do puzzles at whatever level to enjoy repeated feeling of success. Puzzles should be designed so that children can easily advance through various stages of puzzle difficulty. Puzzles are an excellent activity to enable kids to think critically.

I fully agree with Lloyd, and believe this prince of puzzles was most apt in saying that “Puzzles are a school for cleverness and ingenuity”.

[This article is by Mr.S.Muraleedharan, who has worked as a Maths Teacher in Kendriya Vidyalaya Port Trust for several years. The author conducts motivational sessions both for students and teachers. He handles the column “Work it Out” for school children in Deccan Chronicle.]

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Pleasures Of Reading

Reading is to mind while exercise is to the body. “A man may as well expect to grow stronger by always eating as wiser by always reading.”

But why do we really need to read? “Reading sweeps the cobwebs away.” What does this means? “Reading enhances thinking. It stretches and strains our mental muscles. It hits our narrow, delicate, intolerant views with new ideas and strong facts. It stimulates growing up instead of growing old.

In other words, reading develops us. It scratches those itches down deep inside. It takes us through virgin territory we would not otherwise discover.

There are three classifications of reader: simple reader, gentle reader and intelligent reader.

The Simple reader is an ordinary book consumer who read to make use of his spare time. Without any definite purpose, more often than not he does not read a book the second time.

The Gentle reader, who wants to grow and who turns to books as a means of purifying his tastes depends his feelings, broadening his sympathies and enhancing his joy in life. He reads not from a constraint of fashion of learning, but from a thirst of pleasure. Such enjoyment re-establish the heart and quickens it, makes it stronger to endure the ills of life and more fertile in all good fruits of courage, love and cheerfulness.

The Intelligent reader is the particular type of reader whose aim in reading is to obtain better acquaintance with facts. His greatest desire is to learn about things and he treasures books because of the accuracy of information they contain.

To become a good reader, here are some pointers.

– Maintain a healthful routine. This means that to read at your best, you must be in good physical condition. Most of us read only when we are stranded in an island or when we. are confined in the hospital.

– When reading avoid unnecessary distractions. Some people we know have trained themselves to read in noisy surroundings. Most persons, however, find it easier to read in a disturbing sights and sounds.

– Have a clear objective for your reading. Why do you read? And why do you read that kind of book? When you turn the printed page, you should have a clear purpose for reading in mind. Just saying the word’s silently while your mind is elsewhere, or when you have no goal for your reading, is a waste of time.

– Get into the habit of reading widely. You can improve your reading ability only by reading abundantly. Get into the habit of reading a great deal. You may start with light materials – with a popular magazine, a daily newspaper, or a book of easy short stories.

Find time to discover the richness of reading. Reading can make you rich in mind and soul. Try reading, you’ll enjoy it!


[From http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Pleasure-of-Reading&id=2474444%5D

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Book Highlight



Told in diary form by an irresistible heroine, this playful and perceptive novel from the New York Times bestselling author of the May Bird trilogy sparkles with science, myth, magic, and the strange beauty of the everyday marvels we sometimes forget to notice.

Spirited, restless Gracie Lockwood has lived in Cliffden, Maine, her whole life. She’s a typical girl in an atypical world: one where sasquatches helped to win the Civil War, where dragons glide over Route 1 on their way south for the winter (sometimes burning down a T.J. Maxx or an Applebee’s along the way), where giants hide in caves near LA and mermaids hunt along the beaches, and where Dark Clouds come for people when they die.

To Gracie it’s all pretty ho-hum…until a Cloud comes looking for her little brother Sam, turning her small-town life upside down. Determined to protect Sam against all odds, her parents pack the family into a used Winnebago and set out on an epic search for a safe place that most people say doesn’t exist: The Extraordinary World. It’s rumored to lie at the ends of the earth, and no one has ever made it there and lived to tell the tale. To reach it, the Lockwoods will have to learn to believe in each other—and to trust that the world holds more possibilities than they’ve ever imagined.

Book info & cover courtesy: goodreads.com